Man reading book

UNDERSTANDING HAYFEVER

HAYFEVER: TYPES AND SYMPTOMS

Allergic rhinitis, commonly known as hayfever, has two different types: seasonal and perennial hayfever. Seasonal hayfever can be caused by outdoor wind-borne allergens like pollen from trees, weeds, and grass. Perennial hayfever which can happen year-round, is often caused by indoor allergens, such as dust mites, pet dander and indoor moulds.1

Hayfever is characterised by the following symptoms:

  • Sneezing
  • Runny nose
  • Itchy nose
  • Blocked nose
  • Sinus pain & congestion

SEASONAL HAYFEVER: DISEASE PATHWAY

An allergic inflammation of the nasal airways is known as hayfever or allergic rhinitis. Seasonal hayfever is usually cause by pollen, weeds and grasses.2 Inflammation occurs when an allergen (like pollen) enters the nasal passage ways and is seen by the body as an intruder. From there, the body attempts to attack and remove the intruder by activating allergic responses.3  

PERENNIAL HAYFEVER: DISEASE PATHWAY

Perennial rhinitis is characterised as occurring for at least one hour on most days throughout the year.4

Allergens that trigger symptoms of perennial hayfever include dust mites and animals – especially household pets like cats and dogs.4 Other possible triggers include mould on wallpaper, houseplants, and carpeting.3
 

ALLERGY RELIEF WITH FLIXONASE

For those experiencing seasonal hayfever or perennial hayfever, the good news is that FLIXONASE can help. Flixonase offers 24-hour relief from nasal hayfever symptoms and works directly at the source where you need it most. Find where to buy Flixonase.
 

Allergy Season



References

1. https://www.allergy.org.au/images/pcc/ASCIA_PCC_Is_it_allergic_rhinitis_2017.pdf

2. http://www.aafa.org/page/rhinitis-nasal-allergy-hayfever.aspx

3. American Academy of Otolaryngology. Allergic Rhinitis, Sinusitis, and Rhinosinusitis. http://www.entnet.org/content/allergic-rhinitis-sinusitis-and-rhinosinusitis. Accessed April 20, 2015.

4. NIH. Perennial Rhinitis. http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC1112817/. Accessed April 20, 2015